A Reading By Harmony Holiday
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Chicago Review and the Regenstein Library proudly present a reading by Harmony Holiday:
 
Regenstein Library, Room 122
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
 
Wednesday, April 5, 2017
6:00 – 8:00PM

 

Harmony Holiday is the author of Negro League Baseball, Go Find Your Father/ A Famous Blues and most recently Hollywood Forever. She is also the founder of Mythscience, an arts collective devoted to cross-disciplinary work that helps artists re-engage with their bodies and the physical world in this so-called digital age, and the Afrosonics archive of jazz and everyday diaspora poetics. She studied rhetoric and at the University of California, Berkeley and taught for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre. She received her MFA from Columbia University. She is currently working on a book of poems and lyric essays on reparations, called Reparations and a biography of jazz singer Abbey Lincoln. She lives in Los Angeles.

 

Chicago Review
 
Please see and share the flyer linked here featuring the cover of Harmony Holiday’s latest book Hollywood Forever
In Memoriam Michael O’Brien
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“To live high, up among the cornices, from exception to exception, hearing an earthly music.” Since Michael O’Brien died on November 10, 2016, these words, from his elegy for his friend George Quinan, have been on my mind. Now that Michael is gone, they seem somehow to elegize him, too—to describe a way of life he sought in poetry, a state of heightened attention, mobile and light, on the wing yet always down-to-earth, every syllable attuned to the music. Not the poetry of extraordinary sights and elevated feeling, but rather a poetry uncannily alert to the most ordinary details: Michael’s attention could make anything exceptional.

Read more in Commentary.

 

Issue 60.2: Helen Adam & Her Circle
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A captivating look at the poet Helen Adam and her circle of collaborators

Guest-edited by Alison Fraser

In this issue Chicago Review features a special portfolio of documents surrounding Helen Adam and her closest collaborators in the San Francisco Renaissance: the visual artist Jess Collins and the poet Robert Duncan. Published here is an expansive selection of letters between Adam and Jess, accompanied by reproductions of photographs and scrapbooks in which they explored a shared “mystical” aesthetic. These letters and artifacts span more than a quarter century, providing a never-before-seen glimpse into their collaborative process.

Completing the feature are two essays in which Adam and Duncan admire each other’s work and express their affinity for a late twentieth-century visionary poetics, along with “The Nurse Speaks for R. D.,” Adam’s previously unpublished poem for Duncan.

This special portfolio places Helen Adam back in the center of the postwar San Francisco and New York avant-gardes. Preview the feature here.

Christmas 2016

Pre-order Now!

Chicago Review Presents: A Reading by Ed Roberson
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On Thursday, February 11, Ed Roberson will read at the University of Chicago. Roberson is the recipient of the 2015 Ron Offen prize and the subject of a special section in the upcoming issue of CR. He will read from his ten books of poetry and present unpublished work.

Event co-sponsored by the Ron Offen Poetry Prize Fund and the Program in Poetry & Poetics

Thursday, February 11, 6 PM

Logan Center for the Arts

Seminar Terrace, Room 801

University of Chicago

915 E. 60th St.

Free admission

Issue 58:3/4 is off to print!
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CR 58:3/4, “Elliott Carter: Settings” is at the printer! In addition to the launch reading and concert next week at the University of Chicago, be sure to join us in print by preordering now. The new issue features

A PORTFOLIO of Carter’s essays on composition; his correspondence with John Ashbery and John Hollander; a checklist of his vocal works; and a new interview with David Schiff;

ESSAYS on Carter’s work by Lloyd Schwartz, Richard Saez, David Schiff, Lawrence Kramer, Jeff Dolven, Tony Arnold, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Ray Ragosta, and John Link;

POETRY by Clark Coolidge, Allen Fisher, Laura Kilbride, Mary Margaret Sloan, George Albon, John Godfrey, Will Alexander, Ted Pearson, Chris Glomski, William Fuller, Sandra Simonds, Peter O’Leary, and Micah Ballard; and translations by Henry Weinfield;

FICTION by Lina Ferreira C-V; and by Sylwia Siedlecka translated by Jennifer Croft; and by Patricio Pron, translated by Kathleen Heil;

A rich selection of REVIEWS of work by Redell Olsen, Anne Waldman, Peter O’Leary, Arno Bertina, Odon von Horvath, and Peter Gizzi; and of Emmett Williams’s anthology of concrete poetry;

And a MEMORIAL ESSAY on Amiri Baraka by Haki R. Madhubuti

Issue 58:2 is off to print!
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CR 58.2 is at the printer. Preorder now to look forward to

POEMS by Karla Kelsey, Donna Stonecipher, Clark Coolidge, Amanda Nadelberg, Oliviero Girondo (tr. Harris Feinsod & Rachel Galvin), Hirato Renkichi (tr. Sho Sugita), and Lisa Cattrone;

FICTION by Eduard Márquez (tr. Lawrence Venuti), Christina Hesselholdt (tr. Roger Greenwald), Michelle Dove, Brandi Wells;

CORRESPONDENCE between Robert Creeley and Larry Eigner (July—September 1951);

An ESSAY on lyric by Paul van Ostaijen (tr. Sascha Bru & Tom Willaert); an ESSAY on Edward Dorn by Stephen Fredman;

An INTERVIEW with Valerio Magrelli (by Dylan J. Montanari);

A host of fantastic REVIEWS: Richard Eldridge on Oren Izenberg, Nausicaa Renner on Lisa Robertson, Denise Dooley on Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky, Brady Smith on Ivan Vladislavic, Jose-Luis Moctezuma on Heriberto Yepez, Michael Autrey on Karl Ove Knausgaard, Andrew Peart on Richard Owens;

and a gorgeous COVER by Chicago’s Sonnenzimmer (www.sonnenzimmer.com)

Issue 58:1 is off to print!
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There’s so much to look forward to:

A strange and wonderful insert on the typography of blank pages, by Laksmi Cohen-MacGregor;

New poems by Lisa Jarnot, Phil Cordelli, Alfred Starr Hamilton, Eric Ellingsen, Tom Raworth, Marjorie Welish, Wong May; and Abdellatif Laâbi, translated by Andrew Zawacki;

New fiction by Matthew Nye; Felicitas Hoppe, translated by A. A. Srinivasan; and Sergio Pitol, translated by Cynthia Steele;

Nonfiction by Nathanaël, Rob Halpern, and J. H. Prynne;

A note on Kirill Medvedev; and, as always, rich reviews.

Lit Pub Reviews Issue 57:1/2
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The Lit Pub reviews our Ammons issue, 57:1/2. 

“Crass. Delicate. Geometric. Spare. Ammons’ work ties up our ways of knowing the world in a textile, one that reaches beyond the view of the eye when held up at arm’s reach. It is crass because it understands the world is profane in its abundance. It is delicate because it intimately knows the bluejays, pebbly sluices, orange juice, broken bones, and the after-effects of spring rains on earth worms’ chances of survival.

The Chicago Review keeps this substance in its rawest form, displaying copies of unpublished, typewritten, hand-edited drafts. (It even has the scroll of Ammons’ long poem Tape copied on its spine.) And the volume also provides sufficient analytical footwork, via four well-crafted essays, to catch the reader up to speed on the major readings of Ammons’ premier poems.”